April 26, 2018

Podcast: Luis Moreno Ocampo responds to your questions

Hi everyone

I had the chance to ask eight of the questions you submitted through the website to the ICC Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo, yesterday. As I told him, there were more questions than we had time for and so I prioritized those that had been asked by more than one person.Przepraszam, ten artykul jest dostępny tylko w języku angielskim

Hi everyone

I had the chance to ask eight of the questions you submitted through the website to the ICC Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo, yesterday. As I told him, there were more questions than we had time for and so I prioritized those that had been asked by more than one person.

I have to say, it was *weird* to play the role of being a conduit for the questions of others – – I’m used to asking my own! And probably additionally weird because it was with someone I spent the past 18 months working with. Still, it is the purpose of the podcasts to let your questions get through and I do think it’s really important. But for the next one I might at least take on the role of pushing to follow-up the questions when I think the interviewee has taken them in an interesting direction and/or when they have dodged the issue completely.  This part of the project is very much a work-in-progress so I hope you’ll stick with me as I improve it over time.

Moreno Ocampo and I also had a more informal conversation after the official podcast was over. I will add pieces of that to the site as I get the chance, and also write up some impressions/reflections. But as you will hear, his main frustration was that the advocacy community is becoming divided over, and focused on, issues that are peripheral to the situation of people inside Darfur today. You can listen to the podcast for yourselves . . .

Here is a guide to the recording:

0:01 – Introduction

1:31 – Question1

Why didn’t you opt for a sealed arrest warrant for those you have charged in the Darfur cases, like the Prosecutor did at the Special Court for Sierra Leone did with the arrest warrant for Charles Taylor? Wouldn’t this have given you the possibility of a surprise arrest?

3:35 – Question 2

What is happening in Darfur today?

5:58 – Question 3

Do you believe damage has been done to peace and justice in Darfur since the line of argument on genocide that you presented was rejected by the judges?

7:00 – Question 4

People have concerns about the ICC’s power to enforce its warrants. They ask: What can be done to stop Bashir when he is hosted by the Arab League summit and treated with honor and respect

9:24 – Question 5

What action can citizens take to support the execution of the arrest warrant?

[These final three questions are a compilation of numerous questions submitted by people in the U.S. who are keen to hear what the U.S. can do to support the Court ]

10:25 – Question 6

What do you see as the greatest impediment to justice in Darfur? What role can the United States realistically take in bringing peace to this desperately troubled region?

11:37 – Question 7

What are the top 3 things the US can/should do to help the ICC’s Darfur cases?

12:44 – Question 8

Recognizing the more adversarial position of states in the Global South towards the U.S., do you think it would be helpful or harmful to the Court if President Obama tried to get the U.S. to join the Court?

Many thanks to everyone who submitted questions.

I have to say, it was *weird* to play the role of being a conduit for the questions of others – – I’m used to asking my own! And probably additionally weird because it was with someone I spent the past 18 months working with. Still, it is the purpose of the podcasts to let your questions get through and I do think it’s really important. But for the next one I might at least take on the role of pushing to follow-up the questions when I think the interviewee has taken them in an interesting direction and/or when they have dodged the issue completely.  This part of the project is very much a work-in-progress so I hope you’ll stick with me as I improve it over time.

Moreno Ocampo and I also had a more informal conversation after the official podcast was over. I will add pieces of that to the site as I get the chance, and also write up some impressions/reflections. But as you will hear, his main frustration was that the advocacy community is becoming divided over, and focused on, issues that are peripheral to the situation of people inside Darfur today. You can listen to the podcast for yourselves . . .

Here is a guide to the recording:

0:01 – Introduction

1:31 – Question1

Why didn’t you opt for a sealed arrest warrant for those you have charged in the Darfur cases, like the Prosecutor did at the Special Court for Sierra Leone did with the arrest warrant for Charles Taylor? Wouldn’t this have given you the possibility of a surprise arrest?

3:35 – Question 2

What is happening in Darfur today?

5:58 – Question 3

Do you believe damage has been done to peace and justice in Darfur since the line of argument on genocide that you presented was rejected by the judges?

7:00 – Question 4

People have concerns about the ICC’s power to enforce its warrants. They ask: What can be done to stop Bashir when he is hosted by the Arab League summit and treated with honor and respect

9:24 – Question 5

What action can citizens take to support the execution of the arrest warrant?

[These final three questions are a compilation of numerous questions submitted by people in the U.S. who are keen to hear what the U.S. can do to support the Court ]

10:25 – Question 6

What do you see as the greatest impediment to justice in Darfur? What role can the United States realistically take in bringing peace to this desperately troubled region?

11:37 – Question 7

What are the top 3 things the US can/should do to help the ICC’s Darfur cases?

12:44 – Question 8

Recognizing the more adversarial position of states in the Global South towards the U.S., do you think it would be helpful or harmful to the Court if President Obama tried to get the U.S. to join the Court?

Many thanks to everyone who submitted questions.

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  1. […] Click here to listen to the podcast for Moreno-Ocampo’s answers. […]

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